Economics 101: An Economy Guide For The Present And Future

Economy can easily learned with meals that will have a big impact on personal finance.

With over 40% Americans on some form of government assistance, Americans might not sign up for the American Economic 101 class really soon, however maybe some personal financial guides will assist individuals instead. Finances are in many forms with investments, big ticket items being purchased and everyday income and outgo part of the bulk of concern, yet none as important as the day to day living seems to be.

Part of those worries are attached to the hands of people who buy food, plan meals, serve food to families and pay bills that cook those recipes as well. It is no longer a shock to go to the local grocery store to see the hike in the basic staples rise on a weekly or even daily basis. The USDA estimated food inflation of 3.5% to 3.75% last year with projections higher in 2012. 4.25% to 4.75% will be part of living; without even considering harvests or other influences which are grocery store estimates.

Simple to use economics are easy to follow and become a part of everyday living very quickly when learned well. Savings will be quickly observed by following these facts.

Personal financial food guide

1.  Buy fruits and vegetables in season. Supplement with canned goods when on sale.

2.  Comparison shop either in different grocery stores, through newspapers or online coupon discounts offered.

3.  Take cell phone shots of prices and bring to favorite stores to convince managers to lower prices when items are seen elsewhere for less.

4. Consult a nutritionist for meal planning to get proper nutrition for family members. Free menu planning is available at medical clinics, WIC centers, hospitals and online. Ask for basic nutrition guidelines next doctor visit.

5.  Learn food groups for proper nutrition, meal planning and buying.

 Financial buying/planning guide

1.  Buy food supplies in bulk and freeze to preserve for future use. When a freezer is not at home consider buying with neighbor to share bulk prices.

2.  Avoid waste by budgeting.

3.  Meal plan for a week to utilize purchased food items and to guide shopping spending. Menu organizing can be a family, collective task with leftovers being successfully used.

4.  Watch expiration dates so food is not wasted or causes illness because it was consumed.

5.  Always shop with a list without straying from the listed items.

Photograph:

Refrigerator picture is courtesy photobucket.com

Resource:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204644504576653120117664898.html

http://www.ers.usda.gov/briefing/cpifoodandexpenditures/consumerpriceindex.htm

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